Salt myth-busting quiz

Salt myth-busting quiz

Every day we’re bombarded with different advice about what we should and shouldn’t be eating. Think you know the facts about salt? Take our myth-busting quiz and get the scoop!

1) 75% of salt in our diet is from processed foods
a) True
b) False

Answer: a) True
Many people think they don’t need to worry about their salt intake because they’re not adding salt to meals either during cooking or at the table. However, as 75% of salt in our diet comes from processed foods we eat every day, it’s easy to eat too much of it without realising. Fresh food is always best, but if you are buying packaged foods, choose those that are Tick approved

2) If I reduce my salt intake my body won’t have enough
a) True
b) False

Answer: b) False
It’s actually quite difficult to eat too little salt as it’s found in so many processed foods. Even if you don’t eat much processed food, there’s no need to add salt to your meals. You can easily get enough from salt found naturally in fresh foods or added to some of the processed foods we eat every day, such as bread, breakfast cereal and cheese.

3) Food without salt has no flavour
a) True
b) False

Answer: b) False
If you regularly eat salt, you may have developed a taste for it. But as you gradually reduce salt in your diet it only takes a short time for your tastebuds to adjust, and you’ll find that you hardly miss it! There are lots of ways to add flavour to food without using salt, such as using fresh or dried herbs and spices, lemon or lime zest or juice and marinating fish and meat before cooking.

4) Children need to lower their salt intake too
a) True
b) False

Answer: a) True
A high salt intake can increase your blood pressure at any age, and many children are eating as much salt as adults. Did you know a single ham and cheese sandwich can provide 2 grams of salt? That’s over half the maximum daily intake for 4-8 year olds. 

5) All salts are the same
a) True
b) False

Answer: a) True
There are many different types of salt available – rock salt, sea salt, table salt, Himalayan salt, kosher salt, organic salt, the list goes on. While these salts are produced in varying ways and contain varying amounts of other trace minerals, they all have one thing in common: sodium.  Regardless of the type of salt, they all contribute sodium to your diet, and excess sodium can increase your risk of high blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart disease. Find out the difference between salt and sodium.

6) Many people with high blood pressure don’t know they have it
a) True
b) False

Answer: a) True
In Australia, 4.6 million adults have high blood pressure, and globally this number is as high as 1 in 3 adults. This is a serious issue, considering that many people don’t realise they have high blood pressure as there may be no obvious symptoms. Excess salt is a major contributor to high blood pressure, so it’s well worth making the switch to foods with no added salt. 

7) I don’t have high blood pressure so I don’t need to reduce my salt intake
a) True
b) False

Answer: b) False
While a small amount of salt is important for good health, most people eat too much of it. Eating excess salt in the long term can increase your risk of high blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart disease. We recommend the average adult has less than 6 grams of salt per day to reduce their heart disease risk. Currently, Australian adults are eating an estimated 9 grams of salt per day.

8) Which of the following foods can contain hidden salt?
a) Bread
b) Biscuits
c) Breakfast cereal
d) All of the above

Answer: d) All of the above
Although you may not taste it, foods such as biscuits, breads and breakfast cereals can be surprisingly high in salt. But this doesn’t mean you have to miss out – just make sure you always look for products that have earned the Tick. This means they have met our strict nutrition criteria, so are likely to be lower in salt than other similar products, and therefore are a healthier choice.

Discover herbs and spices you can substitute for salt.

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